New Journal Article: Online relationship marketing and customer loyalty: a signaling theory perspective

Dr. Sheena Lovia Boateng, the Executive Director of PRF, has authored a journal article on Online relationship marketing and customer loyalty: a signaling theory perspective. The paper was published by the International Journal of Bank Marketing. The International Journal of Bank Marketing (IJBM) provides the venue for the dissemination of state-of-the-art research on marketing issues related to a range of financial services providers, from banks and insurers to financial advisors and credit providers. The journal primarily focuses on empirically-based studies, thought pieces and review articles. Due to its international nature, articles featured in IJBM explore financial services marketing issues from every corner around the globe.

Clarivate Analytics: 2017 Impact Factor: 2.294*
Scopus CiteScore 2017: 2.70

Abstract of the Paper

Online technologies have, in recent times, revolutionized the process of relationship building between firms and their customers. Nonetheless, there is a limited focus and theorization when it comes to explaining the link between online relationship marketing (ORM) activities and their impact on firm relationship marketing (RM) objectives. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine the signaling role of ORM activities in generating online trust and customer loyalty, through the lens of the signaling theory.

Design/methodology/approach
Data for the study were gathered through a survey of 429 Ghanaian retail bank customers. Results were analyzed using structural equation modeling techniques.

Findings
The paper highlights the signaling role of engagement and interactivity online in influencing banks’ RM outcomes per the signaling theory. It concludes that bank’s online relationship activities, over and above the online tools utilized, need to communicate appropriate and useful signals in order to positively influence online trust and loyalty among customers.

Originality/value
The study, in its uniqueness, utilizes the signaling theory to explain the role and impact of online RM activities in the banking industry.


Cite As: 1. Boateng, S.L. (In Print). Online relationship marketing and customer loyalty: a signaling theory perspective, International Journal of Bank Marketing, (early cite): https://doi.org/10.1108/IJBM-01-2018-0009

 

New Book on Online Relationship Marketing authored by Dr. Sheena Lovia Boateng

Dr. Sheena Lovia Boateng, the Executive Director of PRF  has authored a book on Online Relationship Marketing – What Works in Ghana. This book seeks to  explore the antecedents and outcomes of Online Relationship Marketing in Ghana. The book is a good guide for conducting literature review in a doctoral thesis. It is also a good example for any business student seeking to use structural equation modelling in a doctoral thesis. The synopsis of the book is as follows:

You are welcome to ONLINE RELATIONSHIP MARKETING – What Works in Ghana. This book has two key audiences. First, it explores the antecedents and outcomes of Online Relationship Marketing (ORM). The antecedents are conceptualised as ORM activities – engagement, interactivity, personalisation and collaboration. The outcomes are trust, commitment and customer loyalty. However, trust and commitment are also conceptualised as mediators between the ORM activities and customer loyalty. Through structural equation modelling, this book examines these relationships to explain the antecedents and outcomes of ORM in a developing economy, Ghana. In this light, researchers and practitioners seeking to understand the constituents of ORM will find this book as a timely resource to understand how ORM is practised in Ghana.Second, the book is a good guide for anyone seeking to undertake or currently enrolled in a doctoral programme in marketing. The book presents a thorough review of ORM, thereby outlining the research gaps that can shape future research. Two research theories – Commitment-Trust theory and Signalling theory – are also reviewed to understand how they can be used to address the research gaps identified. Hence, the book is a good guide for conducting literature review in a doctoral thesis. It is also a good example for any business student seeking to use structural equation modelling in a doctoral thesis.

Buy this ORM Book at Amazon – http://a.co/d/bkbCO7q

Videos in learning in higher education: assessing perceptions and attitudes of students

Videos in learning in higher education: assessing perceptions and attitudes of students

Video is one of the most diversified and distinct virtual learning mediums that capture and present information and offer a sensory learning environment, which enables learners to understand more and retain information better. This study sought to assess the perceptions and attitudes of students at the University of Ghana towards the use of videos as a medium for teaching and learning. Qualitative data was collected using semi structured interviews. Participation was entirely voluntary and was conditional, based on students’ verbal consent. A convenience sample of 20 students responded to a request to participate, and data was analyzed using content analysis. Students perceived videos in general as being of some benefit to their learning activities. Overall, comments on videos as a medium of teaching and learning were positive. However, students had negative perceptions about the nature of the videos they watched. Almost all the participants indicated that they had issues with the content and the format of all the videos they watched. But, majority of the participants perceived that the videos they watched enhanced their learning outcomes and improved their learning approach. Therefore, learning outcomes of students and instructors should be dependent on the manner in which videos are used, as part of the overall academic process. This study is one of the first articles to explore in detail, students’ perceptions and attitudes towards video based teaching in Ghana, and provides interesting insights with regard to the concept and its application in tertiary institutions.


Cite As: Boateng, R., Boateng, S. L., Awuah R. B., Ansong, E., & Anderson, A. B. (2016). Videos in learning in higher education: assessing perceptions and attitudes of students at the University of Ghana. Smart Learning Environments3(1), 8-12. http://doi.org/10.1186/s40561-016-0031-5 Publisher: Springer Open. Download Now

Online relationship marketing and affective customer commitment – The mediating role of trust

Online relationship marketing and affective customer commitment – The mediating role of trust

The pervasive use of information technology has implications for consumer relationship management among financial services organisations. There is a need for increased understanding of how digital channels might influence the development and maintenance of firm–customer relationships and in particular the role of the Internet upon commitment and trust outcomes. Thus, this research aims to determine the relationship between online relationship marketing practices and affective customer commitment, and how this relationship is mediated by online channel trust. Data were collected from 200 online retail bank customers and Structural Equation Modelling was used to test the impact of five key online relationship marketing practices on affective commitment, and how trust mediates these relationships. We found that advocacy and collaboration have a direct relationship with affective commitment, while trust mediates the influence of engagement and personalisation on affective commitment. The article highlights the significance of trust in technology when using online channels to build customer relationships.


  • Boateng, S.L. & Narteh, B. (2016). Online relationship marketing and affective customer commitment – The mediating role of trust, Journal of Financial Services Marketing, 21(2), 127-140. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1057/fsm.2016.5
Digital Enterprises in Africa: A Synthesis of Current Evidence

Digital Enterprises in Africa: A Synthesis of Current Evidence

The digital economy has become a global phenomenon and Africa has not been left out. However, though there is much potential, little is known about the digital enterprises that underpin the digital economy in Africa. This paper, in response, presents a synthesis of available practice-based and academic literature to establish what is known and uncover areas that need further research. This study found that there is a paucity of academic research on digital enterprises in Africa. This is based on the difficulty in obtaining relevant academic literature that responds to the narrow definition of digital economy. However, there are industry reports and anecdotal evidence of enterprises in both formal and informal digital economies. The formal economy embraces firms in telecommunication, digital services, software and IT consulting, hardware manufacturing, information services, platform economy, gig economy and sharing economy. The informal economy embraces informal production activities like repair of digital devices, organising online training sessions and individual entrepreneurs who leverage over-the-top services like WhatsApp and mobile money and cryptocurrency services to operate virtual businesses. There is also the growing dark economy which exists in several forms including cybercrime, digital piracy, simbox fraud and the adult economy. These examples demonstrate some of the opportunities and threats for Africa in the digital economy, for which critical measures beyond regulation may be needed to address and leverage them.

To end this paucity of academic research, some research areas are suggested. These areas include but are not limited to: tracing value creation amongst digital enterprises in Africa, studying the career trajectories of people engaged in the gig economy, studying the motivations of the companies that engage the services of digital enterprises, exploring the impact of cryptocurrencies and mobile money services in digital enterprises, country and cross-country case studies of the various digital platform and digital enterprise issues, and to generation of lessons and best practices for African countries with growing digital economies.

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Cite As:

Boateng, R., Budu, J., Mbrokoh, A.S., Ansong, E., Boateng, S.L. and Anderson, A.B. (2017).  Digital Enterprises in Africa: A Synthesis of Current Evidence, Development Implications of Digital Economies Working Paper Series, No. 2, Centre for Development Informatics, University of Manchester.https://diode.network/publications/